Timeline

Late 1930’s

Late 1930’s

Ventile® was developed by a dedicated team of scientists from the Shirley Institute in Manchester with the original intention of being a substitute material for the construction of fire-hoses.

1939 to 1943

1939 to 1943

Wartime England was in full swing, with pilots flying over the Atlantic in need of a garment that was both comfortable in the cockpit, but also protective should they hit the water. That’s where Ventile® fabric was born.

1943

1943

Ventile® went into mass production and was woven on huge wooden looms by Talbot Weaving in Chorley on the outskirts of Manchester, England.

1953

1953

Sir Edmund Hillary reached the world’s highest point on the first summit of Everest in a garment made of Ventile® fabric.

1979 to 1982

1979 to 1982

Adventurer Sir Ranulph Fiennes crossed the Arctic clothed in Ventile®.

1980 and 90s

1980 and 90s

As dyeing houses go out of business, Talbot Weaving, the owners of Ventile, are no longer able to dye and finish Ventile® Fabrics in the UK. Eastern Switzerland has a reputation for quality finishing and Talbot Weaving sends the loom state fabric to Switzerland for final treatment. This arrangement works well but when the Swiss dye house closes, severe quality problems begin. Talbot Weaving tries two further Swiss dye mills but neither of them can achieve effective dyeing and finishing of Ventile®’s dense weave.

1994 – 1995

1994 – 1995

Stotz & Co. attempt to dye and finish Ventile® fabric, whilst also manufacturing their own equivalent. The company partners with Switzerland’s leading textile finishing expert and, after considerable research, acquires the dyeing and finishing know-how. During the trialling period Stotz & Co. received huge support from the Birkenhead based manufacturer of immersion suits for the Royal Airforce.

1996

1996

The British MoD confirms that Ventile equivalent immersion suits made from Stotz & Co. fabric are of an outstanding quality never seen before. Stotz & Co. decides to extend its supply of performance fabrics to non-military garment manufacturers. With the support of Karol Marketing, a UK based marketing consultancy, the brand EtaProof is created and launched.

1998

1998

Talbot Weaving begins buying white label fabrics from Stotz & Co. and brands these as Ventile.

2017

2017

The owners of Talbot Weaving retire and Stotz & Co. acquires the Ventile® brand.

2018

2018

Stotz & Co. builds upon their keen interest in advanced sustainable textile solutions and invests heavily in developing a range of Ventile Eco fabrics. Initially, the Eco product portfolio consists only of the Ventile Organic fabrics made from organic extra-long-staple cotton but the range expands over the coming years.

Today

Today

Ventile continues to champion the sustainable agenda with their campaign “Join the movement. Love the environment. Choose slow fashion.” The pioneering Ventile Eco range grows to offer 3 completely unique sustainable fabric solutions; Eco Organic, Eco Recycled and Eco Hemp. Ventile Eco Recycled is made entirely from pre-consumer cotton waste, Ventile Eco Hemp is made from a combination of premium extra-long-staple cotton and hemp fibres, and Ventile Organic is made from organic extra long-staple cotton which accounts for only 0.04% of overall cotton production worldwide.